It's a nice day for a summer wedding...

When the weather is beautiful and hot, like it has been for the past few days, I can’t help but think of all the happy couples who got married recently. When you’re getting married in England (or doing anything in England, for that matter!) you can never guarantee the weather. You could decide on an outdoor wedding in a field, with a marquee, in the middle of July, expecting the lovely weather we’ve had recently, but then it may rain heavily for the week preceding the wedding, leading to the field becoming waterlogged and unusable. Or, you could have dreams of a winter wedding with snow on the ground, but the chances of it snowing when you want it to are rather small. You just cannot predict what the weather will do, which is why couples and wedding planners must always have an alternative or ‘wet weather’ plan as a back-up.

The weather can be a cause of a lot of worry for the bride and groom, especially those having outdoor ceremonies, which is usually the most important part of the day. Speaking from personal experience, I can vouch for this! When I got married, we planned on an outdoor ceremony at our venue; I wasn’t keen on the wet-weather option, so I was keeping everything crossed for a hot, sunny day. Our wedding was in the May, so we were expecting dry, mild weather, but the weeks leading up to the wedding were wet, grey and dismal. During this time, our dreams of a hot summer’s day changed into a silent plea of ‘please just be dry for forty-five minutes when the ceremony takes place – then it can rain!’ As it turned out, we needn’t have worried; the day was sunny and warm, and some people even got sunburnt as no one was expecting such good weather. It meant we had the ceremony (and day) that we dreamt of, but it also made me realise how much time I had wasted worrying about the weather; it’s not something I had any control over and my time could have been better spent focussing on some other aspect of the day.

Now, in my role as a wedding planner, I always encourage my couples of embrace their wet-weather plans, so that if they need to be implemented, there will, hopefully, not be too much disappointment or inconvenience. It’s important to remember that it's not the end of the world if you don’t have your ideal weather for your special day. After all, as long as you get to marry your partner/other-half/soul mate/best friend, does it really matter what the weather’s like?